Predictions For The 2020 Hurricane Season Are In

Here is your friendly reminder that Hurricane season kicks off June 1, 2020, and goes until November 30, 2020.  The past 40 some years, I’ve been keeping tabs Hurricane season predictions.  My first was Hurricane David in 1979, and my hometown of Pompano Beach, Florida, was supposed to take a direct hit, but it hit in West Palm Beach.

The 2020 Hurricane Season predictions are in from Colorado State University.  It is expected that we could see “a total of 16 named storms, eight hurricanes, and four major hurricanes are expected this season,” from the Weather Channel.  This indicates an above-normal situation for the Atlantic Hurricane Season for 2020.  Does this mean that we could see landfall of each of those predicated Hurricanes?  You don’t really know, but it, in reality, it only takes one.  In discussions with my meteorology mentor J.B. Elliot, he always recommended that even those far inland in Alabama be prepared because everything that is associated with Hurricanes, torrential rain, damaging winds, tornadoes and more.

For those that love the weather, here is the press release from the Department of Atmospheric Science at Colorado State University, which provides more detail behind their predication of an above-normal season.  In the press release, they note that they “anticipate that the 2020 Atlantic basin hurricane season will have above-normal activity. Current warm neutral ENSO conditions appear likely to transition to cool neutral ENSO or potentially even weak La Niña conditions by this summer/fall. Sea surface temperatures averaged across the tropical Atlantic are somewhat above normal. Our Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation index is below its long-term average; however, most of the tropical Atlantic is warmer than normal. We anticipate an above-average probability for major hurricanes making landfall along the continental United States coastline and in the Caribbean. As is the case with all hurricane seasons, coastal residents are reminded that it only takes one hurricane making landfall to make it an active season for them. They should prepare the same for every season, regardless of how much activity is predicted.”

(Source) For the full article from the Weather Channel, click here.  For the press release from Colorado State University, click here.

Enter your number to get our free mobile app